Bodegas Volver 2012 “Triga” Monastrell (93AG 92RP 91WS)

Bodegas Volver 2012 “Triga” Monastrell (93AG 92RP 91WS)

  • Size: 750ml
  • Item Code: 853891002338
  • Vintage: 2012
$34.99 Regular: $39.99

“(85% monastrell and 15% cabernet sauvignon; made from the estate’s oldest monastrell vines, planted back to 1925): Inky ruby. An exotically perfumed bouquet evokes fresh black and blue fruits, incense, potpourri and five-spice powder. Stains the palate with intense boysenberry and cherry compote flavors, given spine and lift by a zesty mineral nuance. Densely packed yet lithe, finishing with outstanding thrust and smooth tannins that build slowly.” 93 Points Antonio Galloni

“The 2012 Triga, which reached 15.5% alcohol because in their zone 2012 has been drier and warmer than 2011, is a blend of head-pruned Monastrell with some Cabernet Sauvignon from chalk-rich soils fermented in open stainless-steel vats and aged in barrique for 20 months. You can feel the warmth and ripeness of the year in the aromas of prunes, blackberries, thyme and rosemary accented with plenty of sweet spices and smoky notes from the barrel that might need a little bit more time in bottle. The palate is full-bodied, with powerful tannins lifted by the alcohol on a warm finish. I’d wait a little bit for the bottle to render the puppy fat and allow the oak to better integrate. Drink the 2011 before this wine as it should age well. They produced a little bit more in 2012. 17,400 bottles. “ (WA)

The Spanish enologist, Rafael Canizares seeks to achieve the maximum expression of the Tempranillo grape grown in the environment. This winery is located in the best terroir of La Mancha found in the eastern region of the Denomination of Origin. The soil is the reason that the winery committed themselves to purchasing 228 acres of vineyards with an average age of 40 years. The sandy soils (up to 1 meter in depth) has an underlayment of large river stones

Ratings and Awards

  • 92 Wine Advocate
  • 91 Wine Spectator

Spain

With 1,200,000 hectares, Spain has more land under vine than any other country in the world. As of 2004, data from OIV indicates that Spain has 35% more land under vine than Italy or France. However, due to harsh climate, historic setbacks, and past regulatory constraints on irrigation, Spain lags France and Italy in yields and volume of wine produced.

Spain is also the home to many varietals. Tempranillo and Garnacha (Grenache) are widely planted. Grenache, planted in Southern France, is actually Spanish in origin. Other varietals include Viura (or Macabeo), Albarino, Verdejo, Airen, and Palomino and Pedro Ximenez.

Note there there are many local names for the same grape. For example, the massly planted Tempranillo is known as Ull de Llebre in Penedes, Tinto Fino or Tinta Del Pais in Rebera Del Duero, Tinta de Toro in Toro, and Cencibel in Valdepenas!

Spanish Wine Regions:

  1. Rioja Tempranillo and Grenache
  2. Galicia & Castilla y Leon Tempranillo, Albarino
  3. La Mancha Various

Appellation Classifications

Like France and Italy, Spanish wines fall into a similar quality tiered system:

  • Vino De Mesa: Lowest, most basic table wine category. Wine is often made from blended grape varietals and regions. No vintage date nor associated region allowed.
  • Vino Comarcal: Like france’s vin de pays, the wine is associated to a classified region.
  • Vino De La Tierra: Equivalent to France’s VDQS — a category down from DO.
  • Denominaciones de Origen (DO): Wine subjects to rigid regional regulations on grape variety, yields per hectare, alcohol level, and production methods.
  • Denominaciones de Origen Calificada (DOC/DOCa): The most prestigious category created in 1986 to further differentiate the DOs. There are ~55 DOs in Spain but only two — Rioja and Priorato — are prestigiously classified as DOCa.

Unlike Italy, Spain does not have a IGT category. To differentiate higher quality wine that does not satisfy the criteria of DOC (e.g. producers in the DO regions want to use a different grape or vinification method), a subcategory within Vino De Mesa was created. These higher quality wines are allowed to have a vintage year and the broader non-DO classified region on its label.

Useful Terms: DO wine must go through a certain period of aging time. Look for the following terms on the wine label to assess the quality and complexity of the wine:

  • Vino de Cosecha: Vintage wine, with >85% of the grapes harvested in the vintage year.
  • Crianza: Crianza means nursury in Spanish. The wine must be aged in oak barel for 6 months and in bottle for 2 years before being sold to public. * Riserva: Wine must be aged at least 3 years, of which 1+ yr must be in oak barrels. * Gran Reserva: Produced only in the best years, with approval from the local viticulture authority.

Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon makes the most dependable candidate for aging, more often improving into a truly great wine than any other single varietal. With age, its distinctive black currant aroma can develop bouquet nuances of cedar, violets, leather, or cigar box and its typically tannic edge may soften and smooth considerably. It is the most widely planted and significant among the five dominant varieties in the Medoc district of France’s Bordeaux region, as well as the most successful red wine produced in California. Long thought to be an ancient variety, recent genetic studies at U.C. Davis have determined that Cabernet Sauvignon is actually the hybrid offspring of Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Franc. Cabernet sauvignon berries are small, spherical with black, thick and very tough skin. This toughness makes the grapes fairly resistant to disease and spoilage and able to withstand some autumn rains with little damage. It is a mid to late season ripener. These growth characteristics, along with its flavor appeal have made Cabernet Sauvignon one of the most popular red wine varieties worldwide. The best growing sites for producing quality wines from Cabernet Sauvignon are in moderately warm, semi-arid regions providing a long growing season, on well-drained, not-too-fertile soils. Vineyards in Sonoma County’s Alexander Valley, much of the Napa Valley, and around the Paso Robles area of the Central Coast have consistently produced the highest-rated California examples. Typically, Cabernet Sauvignon wines smell like black currants with a degree of bell pepper or weediness, varying in intensity with climatic conditions, viticulture practices, and vinification techniques. Climates and vintages that are either too cool or too warm, rich soils, too little sun exposure, premature harvesting, and extended maceration are factors that may lead to more vegetative, less fruity character in the resulting wine.